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 Post subject: Re: Dealing with overcast and no sun.
PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2012 1:25 pm 
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Location: Maarssen, The Netherlands
Hi again Paul,

I had a go at it. Not really sure if it's ok.

http://home.xmsnet.nl/splspotter/DSC_0035_edit.jpg

1/200
F/5.6
ISO 400
170mm

Thanks for looking at it.

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 Post subject: Re: Dealing with overcast and no sun.
PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2012 1:43 pm 
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Location: Bradford, England.
Quite an important principle with editing is that the larger the image the more flaws show, so for something like this in less than ideal light where you've opened the lens up a bit (thus possibly losing a bit of sharpness) editing to something like 1200 or 1280 will generally give better results.

Try re-editing this to 1200 pixels wide, but try using the histogram to set your contrast. in ACR, push Exposure until the white Luminosity peak just hits the right side of the graph and push Blacks until it just hits the left. You might be surprised at the results. :)

Paul

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 Post subject: Re: Dealing with overcast and no sun.
PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2012 3:34 pm 
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Location: Maarssen, The Netherlands
Paul wrote:
Many people simply choose not to shoot unless the weather's perfect; personally I think that's a bit unrealistic as it's very rare the weather actually is perfect in our part of the world and I still want to enjoy my hobby, so I think it's a good idea to accept less than perfect light and learn how to deal with it.


Spot on! That is exactly the reason that I want to make more out of my 'bad weather' photos.

I did a re-edit that is 1200px and tried to adjust the contrast with the blacks and exposure.

http://home.xmsnet.nl/splspotter/DSC_0035_re-edit.jpg

Thanks again.

Twan

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Twan van Baaren
Editor Manufacturer News
Dutch Aviation Society - Scramble
------------------------------------
www.scramble.nl

Download the latest issue of Scramble Magazine from both the Apple Store or Google Play Store!!


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 Post subject: Re: Dealing with overcast and no sun.
PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2012 3:59 pm 
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Hi again Twan,

That's actually a little overdone. As mentioned in my tutorials, in general images like this the more pixels we have that are off (the left of the histogram) or clipped (the right of the histogram) the less detail we're actually recording. If we look at the histogram in your edit we can see the white Luminosity graph is being pushed beyond both sides, this is leading to the image having too much contrast and a somewhat harsh look.

Image

The general idea to technically get as much detail into standard images like this is to make it so the Luminosity graph touches both sides but doesn't start to make its way up vertically, so something more like this (edited from the original you linked to):

Image

Because there isn't much shadow detail in this image to start with when you push the Blacks you'll notice a thin line stretch out to the left side, if you push so this only just touches the left side you probably won't quite have enough contrast in the image, so it's been pushed a little more until the first little peak is hitting the left side but again, not pushed so far that it starts to make its way up the side vertically. You may also notice a little colour correction from the RGB histogram, it's amazing the effect good colour balance has on exposure so it's worth trying to get that as correct as possible.

Those few little steps have actually given quite a nice, natural looking image:

Image

How does that edit look to you?

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 Post subject: Re: Dealing with overcast and no sun.
PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2012 6:36 pm 
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Looks very nice. Especially compared to the original!

I never knew those photos were worth editing. I threw away a lot of photos in the past due to this weather.
It still will go into my personal collection as I do like photos taken under nice weather conditions better.

Will give the other photos from that day another shot in editing!

Thanks for helping me out again Paul, must be getting tired of me and all my questions :P

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Twan van Baaren
Editor Manufacturer News
Dutch Aviation Society - Scramble
------------------------------------
www.scramble.nl

Download the latest issue of Scramble Magazine from both the Apple Store or Google Play Store!!


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 Post subject: Re: Dealing with overcast and no sun.
PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2012 6:44 pm 
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I'm not getting tired at all! Answering questions and generally trying to help are very much things we want to do on this site. :)

With regard to throwing images away, personally I keep every single frame I shoot for several reasons. The first has been demonstrated here, images you think are uneditable suddenly become worthwhile when your editing skills progress. When I started shooting aviation there were so many times I went out and the weather turned nasty but I kept all the original images, and I'm glad I did because now a few years down the line I've been able to edit many hundreds of them to a decent standard. Not only that, in time most things become special once they're gone. You might take a photo of a KLM Fokker 70 in less than ideal conditions and delete it, but think how valuable that shot will be in, say, 10 years when the 70's are just a distant memory. Even if you haven't edited the photo at least you can say you still have it. :)

Paul

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